Category Archives: Information Design

An Ethnographic Information Design Approach II

Since I have taken new challenges, my commute has changed quite a bit. However, my research+info design mind hasn’t. I can’t help paying attention to emerging patterns during my morning and afternoon commutes (among other daily situations). Last week, I was

An Ethnographic Information Design Approach II

Since I have taken new challenges, my commute has changed quite a bit. However, my research+info design mind hasn’t. I can’t help paying attention to emerging patterns during my morning and afternoon commutes (among other daily situations). Last week, I was

How to mirror brain cognitive processes with Information Design

Information design solutions can look really attractive, but quite a few fail to achieve their intended goal: audience cannot understand them. Why is that? Frequently this occurs when design decisions do not support cognitive activities. Often, this is the consequence of designers

How to mirror brain cognitive processes with Information Design

Information design solutions can look really attractive, but quite a few fail to achieve their intended goal: audience cannot understand them. Why is that? Frequently this occurs when design decisions do not support cognitive activities. Often, this is the consequence of designers

The Curious Case of Information Design

Sometimes I’m puzzled. In theory, information design (at least, the visualising information aspect of the field) has exponentially grown in the last decade. Articles and examples of visualisations and infographics pop almost every day, and now, if you are work

The Curious Case of Information Design

Sometimes I’m puzzled. In theory, information design (at least, the visualising information aspect of the field) has exponentially grown in the last decade. Articles and examples of visualisations and infographics pop almost every day, and now, if you are work

Complexity or poor attention?

Yes, we do live in a complex world. Yes, the constant production of information and the instant access to it also contribute to that complexity. But, are our everyday problems actually more complex than ever or is this the result of how

Complexity or poor attention?

Yes, we do live in a complex world. Yes, the constant production of information and the instant access to it also contribute to that complexity. But, are our everyday problems actually more complex than ever or is this the result of how

The Goldilocks Understanding

Last week, I came across a chapter written by Karl Weick in 1993 about sensemaking and found a few concepts quite useful to better understand information designers’ simplification process and why, often, outputs do not work as intended. It is not

The Goldilocks Understanding

Last week, I came across a chapter written by Karl Weick in 1993 about sensemaking and found a few concepts quite useful to better understand information designers’ simplification process and why, often, outputs do not work as intended. It is not

How to make a grilled cheese sandwich

What do a grilled cheese sandwich and information design have in common?  Both are activities that involve the practice of organising information (or ingredients!), simplifying complexity and, also very important, having fun! “How to make a grilled cheese sandwich” is

How to make a grilled cheese sandwich

What do a grilled cheese sandwich and information design have in common?  Both are activities that involve the practice of organising information (or ingredients!), simplifying complexity and, also very important, having fun! “How to make a grilled cheese sandwich” is

3 Factors for Processing Visual Information

Why some visualisations are more effective than others? Why some visualisations are still not universally understood if I have tested them with a big sample? How can designers improve the effectiveness of visualisations?  Each person interprets visual information in a different way.

3 Factors for Processing Visual Information

Why some visualisations are more effective than others? Why some visualisations are still not universally understood if I have tested them with a big sample? How can designers improve the effectiveness of visualisations?  Each person interprets visual information in a different way.