Posts Tagged: understanding

Implications of dual coding for information design

As part of a project I am collaborating on, I recently learned about dual coding theory which was introduced by Allan Paivio in the 1970s. In short, dual coding is a cognitive psychology theory that argues that the use of visuals and

Implications of dual coding for information design

As part of a project I am collaborating on, I recently learned about dual coding theory which was introduced by Allan Paivio in the 1970s. In short, dual coding is a cognitive psychology theory that argues that the use of visuals and

Reflections on applying information design to the writing process

Each person experiences writing is a different way: while for some people writing comes naturally and words flow one after the others for others writing can take more time and be a harder journey. But, in general, when it is

Reflections on applying information design to the writing process

Each person experiences writing is a different way: while for some people writing comes naturally and words flow one after the others for others writing can take more time and be a harder journey. But, in general, when it is

Will Burtin: neglected giant of information design

I learned about Will Burtin’s work through R. Roger Remington and Fripp’s book a few years ago, but it was love at first sight. The combination of Burtin’s thinking process, ingenuity and direct relevance to what today we referred to as

Will Burtin: neglected giant of information design

I learned about Will Burtin’s work through R. Roger Remington and Fripp’s book a few years ago, but it was love at first sight. The combination of Burtin’s thinking process, ingenuity and direct relevance to what today we referred to as

Culture Matters in Design Education

Increasingly, designers are investing a greater effort to get familiar with their intended-users by learning their needs and motivations. This understanding helps designers make more informed decisions, and consequently create solutions more directly targeted to specific and real user needs. Although

Culture Matters in Design Education

Increasingly, designers are investing a greater effort to get familiar with their intended-users by learning their needs and motivations. This understanding helps designers make more informed decisions, and consequently create solutions more directly targeted to specific and real user needs. Although

The Goldilocks Understanding

Last week, I came across a chapter written by Karl Weick in 1993 about sensemaking and found a few concepts quite useful to better understand information designers’ simplification process and why, often, outputs do not work as intended. It is not

The Goldilocks Understanding

Last week, I came across a chapter written by Karl Weick in 1993 about sensemaking and found a few concepts quite useful to better understand information designers’ simplification process and why, often, outputs do not work as intended. It is not

Unambiguous communication: the key to understanding

In many previous posts (e.g. here, here, here), I have written about understanding, but a key part for effectively achieving understanding is clear communication. Every day we interact and communicate with family, friends, colleagues, students, and people on the street (e.g. giving a direction). However

Unambiguous communication: the key to understanding

In many previous posts (e.g. here, here, here), I have written about understanding, but a key part for effectively achieving understanding is clear communication. Every day we interact and communicate with family, friends, colleagues, students, and people on the street (e.g. giving a direction). However

Design thinking revised

I recently came across the article ‘Is “Design Thinking” the new liberal arts?’ which analyses design thinking from the viewpoint of the d.school at Stanford University (where design thinking started to be officially taught), and its application as a learning

Design thinking revised

I recently came across the article ‘Is “Design Thinking” the new liberal arts?’ which analyses design thinking from the viewpoint of the d.school at Stanford University (where design thinking started to be officially taught), and its application as a learning